Royal Purses

Posted by on Nov 30, 2017 in News, Purse News, Research
Royal Purses

ROYAL PURSES Author: Barbara Catanese   Purses that belonged to particular people are always charming; as for me I have a deep penchant for history.  Therefore when, some time ago, I succeeded in acquiring this purse, I was overwhelmed by strong emotions. As you can easily see it’s a sable pouch (height 7cm, diameter 9cm) […]

A Woman Seen Through The Eye of Her Needle

Posted by on May 25, 2017 in News, Purse News, Research
A Woman Seen Through The Eye of Her Needle

A woman seen through the eye of her needle: A reflection on the importance of workbags in the past centuries Author: Barbara Catanese Rome, 18th May 2017 “A workbag seems to be such a common name for a lovely creation” and indeed the seventeenth and even more the eighteenth workbags are such delightful silk wonders […]

The Original “Pink Ladies” Car, complete with Lipstick Holder and Pink Umbrella

Posted by on May 6, 2017 in News, Purse News, Purse Tales, Research
The Original “Pink Ladies” Car, complete with Lipstick Holder and Pink Umbrella

Between 1955 and 1956, Dodge produced the first car specifically marketed to women, which came in pink exterior and a pink handbag.

Highlights from the Fielding Collection of Early American Art: 1776 Pocketbook

Posted by on May 6, 2017 in News, Purse News, Purse Tales, Research
Highlights from the Fielding Collection of Early American Art: 1776 Pocketbook

Check out this amazing flame stitch pocketbook from the Fielding Collection of Early American Art.

Antiques Roadshow appraises $5,000 purse

Posted by on May 6, 2017 in News, Purse News, Research
Antiques Roadshow appraises $5,000 purse

Antiques Roadshow recently featured a Walton & Company beaded purse appraised at $4,000 – $5,000. It has jade plaques and is 18K gold. This isn’t the first time the Roadshow has featured a purse. Catch up Antiques Roadshow’s purse appraisals

Iroquois Beaded Purses

Posted by on Oct 31, 2016 in News, Purse News, Research
Iroquois Beaded Purses

By Richard Green, Bead Society of Great Britain
A wide range of beaded purses and other articles of beadwork were made by Iroquois peoples over several decades of the 19th century for the souvenir market in the North American Northeast. They were sold to early European and Euro-American visitors to the region at tourist venues such as Niagara Falls, Saratoga Springs, and in the vicinity of Montreal.

The Art of the Bead

Posted by on Oct 12, 2016 in News, Purse News, Research
The Art of the Bead

By Terri Lykins
Many of us have been avid beaded purse collectors for many years, even decades. As a purse collector and restorer, I thought it might be fun to go a bit deeper into the artistic aspects of purse design by describing the different types of beads that were used to construct our bags, and what these finishes and cuts bring to the overall effect of the finished design.

Men’s Purses

Posted by on Oct 9, 2016 in News, Purse News, Research
Men’s Purses

By Barbara Catanese
I think that most of us have mainly or exclusively women’s purses in one’s own collection, but I love men’s purses as well, since not only in the past they were very rich and elaborate but especially because following their path we can rebuild men’s fashion better and imagine what kind of men they were, their way of living, character and hobbies.

Judith Leiber: From Holocaust Survivor to Handbag Icon

Posted by on Aug 29, 2016 in News, Purse News, Research
Judith Leiber: From Holocaust Survivor to Handbag Icon

By Christine Giordano, Harper’s Bazaar
At 95, Judith Leiber carefully walks down an aisle of her palladian-style Hamptons museum surrounded by 1,500 handbags, most of them bedazzled with thousands of crystals. Her eyes graze two small metal clutches-one shaped like an eggplant and the other, an asparagus. “I just thought it was a good idea to try to make something strange we’d never made before,” Leiber shrugs. “They’re still selling.”

The Killer Mobile Device for Victorian Women

Posted by on Jul 5, 2016 in Research
The Killer Mobile Device for Victorian Women

By Hunter Oatman-Stanford, Collector’s Weekly
Adrift in a sea of digital apps for every imaginable function, we often feel our needs are met better today than in any previous era. But consider the chatelaine, a device popularized in the 18th century that attached to the waist of a woman’s dress, bearing tiny useful accessories, from notebooks to knives. In many ways chatelaines provided better access to such objects than we have today: How often have you searched for your keys or cell phone at the bottom of a cavernous bag?